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Research seminar archive

2013-2014

C-Forge : A Model-Driven Toolchain for Developing and Executing Component-Based Applications with Real-Time Requirements

Dr Diego Alonso
Department of Communication and Information Technologies,
Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena

Friday 18 July
12:00 - 13:00
Watts Building Room 107

Abstract

The talk will revolve around the C-Forge toolchain, developed by the DSIE research group in the Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Spain. C-Forge is built on top of the Eclipse IDE and its model-driven plug-ins. It provides full support for the development of component-based software applications, from modelling to execution. C-Forge integrates two main elements (1) a White-box COmponent MetaModel (WCOMM), which embodies a component model for describing component-based applications, and (2) a C++ framework, entitled FraCC, that provides the required run-time support for executing WCOMM models with different deployment configurations and real-time support. C-Forge comprises three model transformations that generate the artefacts needed to execute applications and to perform a schedulability analysis with the Cheddar tool. A small demonstration will be used to illustrate the aforementioned elements and the overall design process.

Bio
Dr. Diego Alonso, male, received the M.Sc degree in Industrial Engineering from the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia in 2001 and the Ph.D degree from the Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena (UPCT) in 2008. He joined the Department of Communication and Information Technologies of the UPCT in 2004, where he is an associate professor of Software Engineering and Programming Languages since 2010. He has participated in 20 funded projects. He has published 10 JCR-indexed articles and more than 50 papers in conferences and books chapters. He made a pre-doctoral stay at the Triskell group (University of Rennes-1, France) in 2008. He is member of the technical committee “Software Engineering for Robotics and Automation” (TC- SOFT), IEEE Robotics & Automation Society since 2010. His current research interests include model-driven software engineering, robotics, component-based software, and real-time systems.

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Towards long term zero gravity experiments on Pulsating Heat Pipes: the long and winding road that leads to the International Space Station.

Dr. Mauro Mameli
Department of Engineering, University of Bergamo, Italy.
DESTEC, University of Pisa, Italy

Monday 14 July
14:00 - 15:00
Watts Building Room 107

Abstract

The constant need for higher heat dissipation rates, together with the miniaturization of electronics, lead to the spread of two-phase passive heat transfer technologies, commonly known as Heat Pipes. Since the early 90’s a novel concept of wickless Pulsating Heat Pipe has been recognized as one of the most promising: it just consists of a capillary tube bended in many turns, evacuated and filled with a working fluid. Despite of the simple structure, its physical characterization as well as correct design, still represent an undisputed challenge for researchers, a pandora’s vase full of complex interplays between evaporation and condensation, capillary and gravity forces, flow patterns and heat transfer mechanisms (fig.1).

Figure 1: PHP flow pattern visualization:

a
a) Immediately after filling, no heat input;

b
b) thermally induced fluid motion with 50W heating power.

After giving a short appetizer on its working principles, the PHP thermal-hydraulic numerical and experimental characterization is shown; a long and winding road through ground as well as micro and hypergravity experiments, carried out in the last five years (fig. 2), that leads to the final question: why do we need long term zero gravity experiments on the Pulsating Heat Pipe on the International Space Station? The Idea that a particular type of large diameter PHP may be activated only in zero gravity condition is here proposed and put the basis for further discussion.

Figure 2:

a
a) Pulsating Heat Pipe test cell

b
b) Thermal response to varying gravity force

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Scientific Lenses over Linked Data: Identity Management in the Open PHACTS project

Dr Alasdair Grey
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh

Wednesday 21 May
16:00 – 17:00
Watts Building Room 107

Abstract

When are two data resources in different datasets the same? If they have the same name, properties, or some other criteria? The choice depends upon the application to which the data will be put. However, existing Linked Data approaches provide a single global view over the data with no way of varying the notion of equivalence to be applied.

In this presentation, I will introduce Scientific lenses, an approach that enables applications to vary the equivalence conditions between linked datasets. They have been deployed in the Open PHACTS Discovery Platform – a large scale data integration platform for drug discovery.

To cater for different use cases, the platform allows the application of different lenses which vary the equivalence rules to be applied based on the context and interpretation of the links.

Alasdair is a Lecturer in Computer Science at Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh. He previously held postdoc positions in the Information Management Group at the University of Manchester and the Information Retrieval Group at the University of Glasgow. His research focuses on practical data management and its application in information systems – utilising and extending advances in knowledge management technologies to improve information systems. This approach has supported advances in science while deepening the understanding of knowledge based systems to support future applications. He has collaborated with a large range of scientists – from astronomers through the life sciences to environmental scientists – working with both academic research labs and industrial partners.

Principally he addresses the challenges of integrating data from heterogeneous sources; where the heterogeneity can be from the way the data is modelled, represented, or rate of change. The result is a coherent representation of the data to enable analytical or other processing of the data.

http://www.alasdairjggray.co.uk
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5711-4872

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Floasys: A Platform for CFD Workflow Management

Donato Pirozzi
ISISLab, Dipartimento di Informatica, University of Salerno

Wednesday 26 March
16:00 – 17:00
Watts Building Room 504

Abstract

Nowadays, industries use the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to design products impacted by fluid flow, and to get a "better insight into product behaviour". CFD is widely adopted to design the automotive products. The talk introduces Floasys, a collaborative web-based platform for CFD Workflow Management. It has been designed to support the FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles) use case and meet the stakeholders' functional requirements. Some of the Floasys features are: wizards to guide users in the simulation setup, the run of the same simulation with different parameters (e.g. multiple inlet velocities) on HPC resources, the monitor of running simulations independently by simulators (both Star-CCM+ and OpenFOAM), the automatic document generation compliant to internal templates with results collected from multiple simulations. The Floasys architecture integrates existing CFD software and relies on industrial HPC resources. The architecture is modular to configure a system tailored on the customer requirements activating/deactivating modules. It is extensible to integrate other software and to add custom features. At the end, some ideas about the next developments will be discussed. For instance, the integration of a Design of Experiment (DOE) Optimization engine within Floasys to provide an user-friendly GUI to automatically schedule multidisciplinary simulations on multiple CFD software and monitor them getting real-time feedbacks.

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Privacy Requirements Engineering

Dr Christos Kalloniatis
University of the Aegean

Wednesday 26 March
13:00 – 14:00
Watts Building Room 107

Abstract

A major challenge in the field of software engineering is to make users trust the software that they use in their everyday activities for professional or recreational reasons. Trusting software depends on various elements, one of which is the protection of user privacy. Protecting privacy is about complying with user’s desires when it comes to handling personal information. Users’ privacy can also be defined as the right to determine when, how and to what extend information about them is communicated to others. This presentation aims on revealing the “Privacy by design” concept by presenting the way that privacy should be dealt as a separate design criterion during system modelling prior to implementation. Also recent research efforts for designing an modelling security and privacy requirements in cloud-based systems will be presented.

Bio:

Dr. Christos Kalloniatis holds a bachelor degree from the Department of Informatics of the Technological Institute of Athens (2000). In 2001 he took his master degree on Computer Science from the University of Essex, UK. In 2008 he finished his PhD at the Department of Cultural Technology and Communication of the University of the Aegean. From 2012 until middle 2013 he served as a lecturer in the Department of Cultural Technology and Communication of the University of the Aegean. From October 2013 he is an Assistant Professor at the same department. He is an author of several refereed papers in international scientific journals and conferences. His research interests include the elicitation and modelling of privacy requirements during system design in traditional and cloud-based systems.

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Un-Sustainable InfoTech and Ethics: Current InfoTech is unsustainable because ethics are ignored

Dr Karl Cox
Division of Computing, University of Brighton

Wednesday 12 March
16:00 – 17:00
Watts Building Room 504

Abstract

A broad look at the Digital Revolution will reveal an un-sustainable future. The talk will discuss what sustainability really means, why the digital age is ignoring sustainability and why its current shape and form is un-sustainable. The reasons behind this are many but at its heart is an ignorance of ethics. The talk will propose a new ethic for this Digital Age that this School and University should use as the medical world use the Hippocratic Oath. The talk proposes avenues of research and real world teaching to promote and live a truly sustainable life for not only academics but for our students as they graduate and go out into the world.

Bio:

Dr Karl Cox has lived in a country where water supply was down to literally only 6 weeks supply if no rain came; this gave him the impetus to re-evaluate what technology is doing to the world and what we can do about this. In recent years, his core focus of research is environmental pollution from modern technology. His background is a senior research scientist at NICTA, Australia, an entrepreneur and IT consultant, as well as academic researcher.

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Provenance: Where did this data come from?

Dr Kerry Taylor
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO),
Canberra, Australia

Wednesday 4 March
13:00 – 14:00
Watts Building Room 512

Seminar hosted by Gem Stapleton

Abstract

With the rapid rise of cyber infrastructures and open research data initiatives, there is an urgent need for the development of tools, methods and standards for provenance. Scientists are asking whether they can use and trust data produced by others, and part of the answer relies on understanding how that data was produced. The new W3C PROV-O ontology raises the expectations for interoperable provenance records and many widely used workflow engines already log provenance throughout the execution of a scientific workflow.

After a substantial review of drivers and requirements for scientific provenance, we are developing two tools that I will present. The first is a Capability Model for Provenance--that supports the development of requirements for new provenance projects and the benchmarking of existing tools for their solution to requirements in a provenance life-cycle. The second is an ontology-based tool to exploit provenance -- aiming to return investment on provenance capture by exploiting provenance as a long-term, cross-disciplinary or cross-technology knowledge base of how science is done.

Bio:

Kerry Taylor is currently a research group leader in CSIRO, Canberra, Australia. She holds a PhD in Computer Science and Information Technology from the Australian National University for her research in machine learning, and a Bachelor of Science (Honours 1) in Computer Science from the University of New South Wales. She has worked as a computer science researcher, practitioner and teacher in Australia, Canada and the UK, developing software systems for application in scientific research, financial research, library management, business management and publishing. Her research has focused on environmental information systems, particularly on supporting integrated access to heterogeneous information sources using methods founded in formal logic.

Kerry co-chaired the W3C Incubator Group on Semantic Sensor Networks, usually co-chairs the Semantic Sensor Networks workshop at the International Semantic Web Conference, was the Organising Chair of the International Semantic Web Conference in 2013 and is Chair of the Australasian Semantic Web Conference Steering Committee. She is co-chairing the European Semantic Web Conference 2014 track on mobile web, sensors and semantic streams. Kerry is collaborating with Visual Modelling Group at Brighton because she wants to be able to use ontology visualisations in the difficult work of ontology development.

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Crowdsourcing Scientific Research Using Amazon Mechanical Turk

Luana Micallef
School of Computing, University of Kent

Wednesday 19 February
16:00 – 17:00
Watts Building Room 504

Abstract

Crowdsourcing web services like Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) allow online workers to carry out tasks posted by requesters for a small monetary reward. The crowd and MTurk can be used to conduct user studies on large, diverse populations at reduced cost and time compared to traditional laboratory experiments and yet, maintain scientific control. Crowdsourced experiments on MTurk are becoming more popular as the demographics of the workers is now well-understood and MTurk’s viability for scientific research has been verified.

In this talk, I will demonstrate how to set up MTurk, how to run experiments using the web service and the costs involved. I will consider a few case studies of scientific research conducted on MTurk. I will discuss studies that assessed MTurk’s viability for various research areas and others that studied the workers’ demographics. I will conclude with a list of considerations and best practices to design effective crowdsourced experiments on MTurk.

Luana Micallef is a Research Fellow in the School of Computing at the University of Kent, UK with research interests in information visualization, human-computer interaction and visual analytics. She completed her PhD on 'Visualizing Set Relations and Cardinalities Using Venn and Euler Diagrams’ in the same School, for which she developed different Euler diagram drawing software and ran crowdsourced empirical studies on Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). She set up MTurk in her School and is now using it to assess the effectiveness of set visualizations. During her 2011 internship with AVIZ INRIA, she co-devised open-source MTurk task templates and used MTurk to assess the effectiveness of Euler diagrams for Bayesian reasoning. The latter work was awarded a Best Paper Honourable Mention at IEEE InfoVis 2012. She serves on the Conference Committees of IEEE VIS (since 2013) and EG/IEEE EuroVis (since 2014) and in 2012, co-chaired the 3rd International Workshop on Euler Diagrams. Luana was a 2011 Google Anita Borg Memorial Scholarship finalist. She received a first-class BSc (Hons) degree in IT from the University of Malta and the Dean's Excellence Award, in 2008. She interned with Microsoft Research India in 2008, after her team won the Microsoft Imagine Cup 2007 Windows MultiPoint contest. In 2007, she was awarded a CERN summer studentship. http://www.cs.kent.ac.uk/people/staff/lm357

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